Dr. Robert Greenblatt MD, FACP

Robert Greenblatt

908-964-1144

1317 Morris Avenue, Suite #1
 Union, NJ 07083

Our Locations


Robert Greenblatt
1317 Morris Avenue
Suite #1
Union, New Jersey 07083
Phone: 908-964-1144
< Previous Next >


515 North Wood Avenue
Suite # 202-A
Linden, New Jersey 07036
Phone: 908-486-8080
< Previous Next >

Patient Education

Robert Greenblatt would like to be your partner in health care. Feel free to ask your questions and share your concerns with us. We will work with you to develop a wellness program for the care and treatment you need.

We welcome you to our practice and look forward to caring for you.

Robert Greenblatt provides a full range of medical services including the following:


Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

An aneurysm is a localized, balloon-like expansion in a blood vessel caused by weak vessel walls. The aorta is the artery that carries oxygen-rich blood from the heart to the legs. When a bulge occurs in the abdominal section of the aorta, between the diaphragm and the legs, it is called an "abdominal aortic aneurysm." Most aortic aneurysms occur in the abdomen, and most abdominal aortic aneurysms occur beneath the kidneys, and may continue into the iliac (leg) arteries. ...


Read More...

Bariatric Surgery

Bariatric surgery is a surgical treatment for patients who are seriously obese, or obese and have another dangerous medical condition. There are several types of bariatric surgery, each of which makes surgical changes to the stomach and digestive tract that limit how much food can be ingested, and how much nutrition can be absorbed. All types of bariatric surgery are performed to promote weight loss. ...


Read More...

Bloating

Bloating occurs when gas builds up inside the abdomen as digestion occurs. Bloating can result in discomfort, pain, a distended abdomen, or excessive gas (flatulence). In most instances, bloating is a benign symptom, easily preventable or treatable, but severe, persistent or chronic bloating may indicate a more serious digestive disturbance. When bloating is an ongoing symptom, or when it is accompanied by worsening heartburn, abdominal or chest pain, blood in the stool, diarrhea, nausea, vomiting, or weight loss, a physician should be immediately consulted. ...


Read More...

Cholecystitis

Cholecystitis is the inflammation of the gallbladder, the small organ behind the liver. The great majority of cases of cholecystitis result from the presence of gallstones, though the disorder may also occur because of another disease or, rarely, a tumor in the area. Normally, the gallbladder releases bile to the small intestine as needed, but when there is a blockage bile builds up in the gallbladder, resulting in pain, swelling and possible infection. While the gallbladder plays a part in the digestive process, it is not a vital organ and can be removed if necessary for the patient's health and well-being. ...


Read More...

Colorectal Cancer

Colorectal cancer, also known as colon cancer, develops in the large intestine or the rectum. Cancer occurs when healthy cells become altered, growing and dividing in a way that keeps the body from functioning normally. Most cases of colorectal cancer begin as small, benign clusters of cells (polyps) on the lining of the colon or rectum. Certain types of polyps, called adenomas, can become malignant. ...


Read More...

Crohn's Disease

Crohn's disease is a disorder that causes inflammation of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. The inflammation is usually found in the small intestine (the ileum), but can occur in any area of the GI tract, which stretches from the mouth to the anus. Crohn's is an inflammatory bowel disease, which, like irritable bowel syndrome and ulcerative colitis, causes swelling of the intestines. ...


Read More...

Diverticulitis

Diverticulitis is the inflammation of the diverticula, small pouches found in the inner lining of the intestinal tract. Diverticulosis, the condition that causes the pouches to form, is common in people age 40 and older. Nearly half the people in the United States develop diverticulosis by the age of 60. Diverticula, which are multiple small pouches, can occur anywhere along the digestive tract, but are most commonly found in the lower portion of the large intestine, the sigmoid colon. Most often, these pouches are not troublesome, but when they become infected and inflamed, the resulting condition is known as diverticulitis. ...


Read More...

Diverticulosis

Diverticulosis is a common disorder in which small pouches, known as diverticula, develop along the wall of the colon (large intestine). This condition frequently develops during aging and is evident in about half of all individuals older than 60. In the majority of cases, approximately 80 percent, individuals who have diverticulosis are asymptomatic. About a fifth of all patients with diverticulosis, however, develop the more serious symptoms of diverticulitis, a form of diverticular infection that results in severe symptoms, including fever, severe abdominal pain, cramping and rectal bleeding. ...


Read More...

Dysphagia

Dysphagia, also known as a swallowing disorder, is not an uncommon condition. Because the swallowing process is vital to gastrointestinal health, and the throat functions as a pathway for respiration as well as ingestion, swallowing disorders are not only uncomfortable, but may be life-threatening. There are two types of dysphagia: esophageal and oropharyngeal. Esophageal dysphagia refers to the sensation of food getting stuck in the base of the throat or chest after swallowing. Oropharyngeal dysphagia is caused by weakened throat muscles that make it difficult to move food from the mouth into the throat and esophagus when swallowing. Older individuals are more commonly affected by oropharyngeal dysphagia because of weaker teeth and throat muscles. In addition, people with neurological problems or nervous system disorders may also experience oropharyngeal dysphagia. Individuals who suffer from acid reflux or esophageal problems are more likely to suffer from esophageal dysphagia. ...


Read More...

Endoscopic Retrograde Cholangiopancreatography

Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) is a diagnostic procedure performed to detect abnormalities in the liver, gallbladder, pancreas and bile ducts. It is performed using an endoscope (a lighted tube snaked down the esophagus) and X-rays to obtain a detailed view of the gastrointestinal region. ...


Read More...

Flexible Sigmoidoscopy

A flexible sigmoidoscopy is a diagnostic procedure performed to examine the sigmoid, the lower and last end of the colon, also known as the descending colon. The rectum and sigmoid colon are parts of the gastrointestinal tract. The rectum is approximately six inches long and is located between the sigmoid colon and the anus. A flexible sigmoidoscopy procedure is often used to determine the cause of changes in bowel activity, abdominal pain, rectal bleeding and to investigate other gastrointestinal symptoms. ...


Read More...

Gastric Cancer

Gastric cancer, also known as stomach cancer, begins in the stomach, which has three layers of tissue. Ninety-five percent of gastric cancers are adenocarcinomas, which develop from the mucosa, the cells that form the stomach's innermost lining. As gastric cancer progresses, it can grow through the walls of the stomach to nearby organs, or can spread to nearby lymph nodes. Other types of malignant tumors that can form in the stomach are lymphomas, gastric sarcomas and carcinoids, but they occur rarely. ...


Read More...

Gastroenteritis

Gastroenteritis (stomach flu) is the inflammation of the gastrointestinal tract. It is a very common ailment affecting approximately one in six people in the United States each year. Gastroenteritis may be caused by a virus, bacteria, a parasite, or by the ingestion of a drug or chemical toxin. Most forms of gastroenteritis are contagious, transmitted through contaminated water or food, or spread person-to-person. Although usually self-limited and not life-threatening, gastroenteritis can be dangerous to the very young, very old and immunocompromised. ...


Read More...

Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease

Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), also known as acid reflux, occurs when stomach acid, used for digestion, regurgitates or refluxes into the esophagus, causing inflammation and damage to the lining of the esophagus. GERD is a complication of gastroesophageal reflux, also known as GER, a less serious form of GERD. Most people have occasional episodes of GER, but when GER becomes more frequent, occurring more than two times a week, it is classified as GERD. The stomach acid causes pain or burning in the chest or throat, known as heartburn. ...


Read More...

Irritable Bowel Syndrome

Irritable bowel syndrome, also known as IBS or spastic colon, is a disorder of the gastrointestinal tract. IBS is not a disease, but a functional disorder. Although, unlike Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis, it is not a form of inflammatory bowel disease, it causes very uncomfortable, and sometimes embarrassing, symptoms that require long-term management. ...


Read More...

Lactose Intolerance

Lactose intolerance, also known as lactase deficiency, is the inability to fully digest lactose, a milk sugar found in dairy products. While lactose intolerance is not usually a serious condition, it can produce uncomfortable symptoms. In order to manage or eliminate such symptoms, certain dietary changes are necessary. Patients with lactose intolerance, depending on the severity of the condition, have to limit or eliminate their intake of dairy products, take supplements of the enzyme their bodies fail to produce, or consume lactose-free dairy products. Lactose intolerance is a common condition, affecting more than half of adults as they age. ...


Read More...

Liver Failure

Liver failure can be acute, in which case it occurs suddenly in a previously healthy patient, or it can be the final stage of ongoing liver disease. Because the liver is an essential organ with metabolic and blood-filtering functions, when it fails permanently, the patient dies. In cases where liver failure is caused by a virus or poisoning, however, treatment may enable the liver to recover. In some situations, a liver transplant may provide recovery even from liver failure caused by chronic disease. ...


Read More...

Nissen Fundoplication

A Nissen fundoplication is a surgical procedure to tighten the lower esophageal sphincter, the valve between the esophagus and the stomach. The operation treats gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) by preventing stomach acid from backing up. During the procedure, the upper end of the stomach, known as the fundus, is wrapped around the lower esophagus to strengthen the barrier between the two organs. Performed laparoscopically, the surgery requires only small incisions and results in less scarring and a shorter recovery period than an open procedure. A hiatal hernia can also be repaired during this operation. ...


Read More...

Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a common disorder in which an individual who consumes little or no alcohol accumulates fat around the liver. For most people who have this condition, there are no symptoms or complications. Nonetheless, because the liver is a vital organ, once NAFLD progresses causes liver dysfunction it becomes serious and potentially life-threatening. In fact, cirrhosis resulting from NAFLD is now one of the leading reasons for liver transplants in the United States. ...


Read More...

Rectal Cancer

Rectal cancer develops in the tissues of the rectum, which is the final six inches of the colon that extend to the anus. Most cases of rectal cancer begin as small, benign clusters of cells (called polyps) on the lining of the rectum. Certain types of polyps, called adenomas, can become malignant. Screening to locate and remove precancerous polyps can prevent rectal cancer from developing, so it is recommended that polyps be removed early in their growth. ...


Read More...

Ulcerative Colitis

Ulcerative colitis is a chronic inflammation in which sores develop on the innermost lining of the colon and rectum. One of the inflammatory bowel diseases, ulcerative colitis often flares up during periods of physical and emotional stress. The disorder results in painful, often debilitating symptoms, and can eventually lead to colon cancer. It can, however, be managed with treatment. ...


Read More...

Upper Endoscopy

Upper endoscopy, also known as esophagogastroduodenoscopy or EGD, is a diagnostic procedure used to visually examine and diagnose conditions of the upper gastrointestinal, or digestive tract. The upper gastrointestinal tract includes the esophagus, stomach and duodenum, or upper part of the small intestine. An upper endoscopy is performed using a flexible tube with an attached light and camera, called an endoscope. It is inserted through the mouth and guided along to thoroughly examine the upper gastrointestinal tract. ...


Read More...

Cirrhosis

Cirrhosis, also known as hepatic fibrosis, is late stage scarring and deterioration of the liver. Resulting from various liver diseases, the scarring from cirrhosis affects blood flow in the liver, reducing the organ's ability to function. Because the liver plays many important roles in the body, including detoxifying the blood, aiding digestion, fighting infection, producing clotting factors and storing energy, cirrhosis is a life-threatening disorder. The condition is one of the leading causes of disease deaths in the United States. ...


Read More...

Heartburn

Heartburn, also known as pyrosis, is a painful, burning sensation in the chest or throat. The problem occurs when stomach acid travels up into the esophagus, the portion of the digestive tract that transports food from the mouth to the stomach. Although heartburn is usually temporary and not serious, for some individuals it develops into a chronic problem. It may be a symptom of a more serious disorder, such as gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), which may eventually cause extensive damage to the esophagus. ...


Read More...

Colonoscopy

A colonoscopy is a diagnostic procedure performed to examine the inside of the colon and rectum; it is used to determine causes of abdominal pain; rectal bleeding; and changes in bowel activity. It is also used to detect early signs of cancer. Colonoscopies are recommended every 10 years for everyone between the ages of 50 and 75. They may be recommended more frequently, or at a younger age, for people at elevated risk of developing colorectal cancer (CRC), typically patients with certain medical conditions or with a family history of the disease. Colonoscopies are also performed as follow-ups to other screening tests with positive results, such as a fecal occult blood tests. ...


Read More...


Back to top
Copyright © 2019 by Dr. Robert Greenblatt MD, FACP and Dr. Leonardo. All Rights Reserved.